LINKS:

Queenstown

Glenorchy

Remarkables drive

Invercargill

Stewart Island

Dunedin

Taeiri Gorge


Oamaru

Lake Tekapo

Akaroa

Sunday, 4 March, Oamaru to Lake Tekapo



First glimpse out the window in Oamaru this morning – fog.

But within the hour, it had all burnt off.

After breakfast, it was into the old town of Oamaru’s historic precinct, the setting for today’s Multisport event – that’s what they called a triathlon-type event along the waterfront. Swimming, cycling and running and by chance, we were there soon after the start.

The historic area is well worth a visit, even without the attraction of these super fit young athletes. The old town area has been largely saved, by viirtue of the business area moving westward, thus removing any pressures to "update" the historic buildings.  That's been a stroke of luck for the local tourist industry. 


The old town is also where the local penguin colonies hang out around dusk, but we missed out on that last night. Too tired to venture out of our motel room.
..Next destination - LakeTepako, noted for nearby ski fields and for star-gazing.…
On the way, a stop at Pleasant Point for coffee and a look at what is billed at the “world’s only T-model rail car”. It probably is the only one in the world - it looks like a small rail carriage bolted onto a Model-T ute.
 
For all visitors arriving from the east coast, the first glimpse of Lake Tekapo is stunning,. The colour of the lake is breath-taking, even under cloudy skies. It’s a vivid turquoise (and no, the photo below hasn't been edited).


The area of Lake Tekapo bills itself as the star-gazing capital of New Zealand. One of the attractions here invites visitors to “combine the stunning Aoraki Mackenzie International Dark Sky Reserve with our soul-warming hot pools”. So that’s what we’re going to do tonight. Even if clouds block out sight of the stars, we’ll still enjoy the hot pools.

(Later)

Yes, we did enjoy the hot pools, even if we couild hardly see any stars through the clouds and occasional rain. 
       
Next: a little history in Lake Tekapo